ETL503 – Assignment 1 – Part B – Annotated resource list.

Resource: The Death of the Oceans? (Threatened Habitats) – 60 mins.

Oxley, P. (Producer), Oxley, P. (Director). (2010). The death of the oceans? [DVD]. United Kingdom: British Broadcasting Corporation Horizons.

Learner-Centered Selection Criteria: Primary Considerations. (S.C.P.C.) (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005) Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Authority.
Learner-Centered Selection Criteria: Secondary Considerations. (S.C.S.C.) (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005.). Aesthetic quality, Reputation of producer.
Selection Aids (S.A.) Produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and promoted as one of the most ambitious scientific studies of our time – an investigation into what is happening to our oceans. (BBC, 2011). Presented by Sir David Attenborough, reviewed by Tim Dowling, writer for The Guardian (The Guardian, 2010.), and supported by analysis which considers the possibility of irrevocable damage to the world’s oceans, by Alex Renton (Newsweek, 2014) this DVD examines the future and possible outcomes for the world’s oceans. Supports threatened habitats (BOSNSW, 2003)

An engaging documentary which exposes some of the effects man is having on marine life from over fishing to the acidification of sea water. It also uncovers the disturbing story of how shipping noise is deafening whales and dolphins, affecting their survival in the future. (BBC, 2010).

Resource: Shark Girl. (Threatened Species)

Kaufman Productions Pty Ltd. and Screen Australia. (Producer), Kaufman, Gisela, (Director). (2013). Shark Girl. [DVD]. Australia: ABC Television.

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Authority, Comparison with others.
S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Aesthetic quality.
S.A. Produced by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC, 2015) and shown on the Smithsonian Channel (SNI/SI, 2010-2015), with supporting reviews by Stephanie Pappas (livescience, 2014) and Erin Corneliussen (smithsonian, 2014), and scientific advice provided by Jennifer Ovenden (molecularfisherieslaboratory, 2014) this show has been made the by award-winning film-makers Gisela and Carsten Kaufman (Ovenden, 2014).
Growing up on the Great Barrier Reef and self labelled as a conservationist, filmmaker, activist and delinquent, 20 year old Madison Stewart has taken her passion for sharks and created an active program to stop the killing of up to 80 000 sharks per year in this UNESCO World Heritage Site(UNESCO, 1992-2105) for cheap fish steaks and luxury shark fin soup. She also investigates how an increasing number of countries are protecting their sharks when she travels to Mexico, Palau and the Bahamas. This DVD engages high school students and creates the opportunity to research the problems faced by this apex predator.

Resource: Ground Water Animation – (Access to fresh water) – 3min 34 sec.

Ranamm. (May 3, 2006). Groundwater Animation, [Video file]. Retrieved from

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement and Organization, Authority.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Aesthetic quality.

S.A. Produced by Seattle Public Schools-TV – Cable Channel 26 (SPS-TV, 2012) and supported by Water Tenders, a community based group who care about wetlands and streams, (Watertenders, 2002) and King County Water and Land Division (King County, 2015), this is a resource which supports the access to fresh water requirement of the Geography 7-10 Syllabus focus area, 4G4 Global Issues and the Role of Citizenship (BOSNSW, 2003).

Produced by three times Emmy Award (Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, 1995-2005) winning production company Leaping Media (Leaping Media, n.d.), this cartoon animation introduces students to the concept of what ground water is, and traces it’s path through the subsurface. It shows uses of water and demonstrates the possible dangers ground water faces from pollution and development. A great platform from which students can investigate ground water issues faced by a growing global population.

Resource: How to dig a well by hand. (Access to clean water) – 8min 18sec.

Fabio Chen (October 6, 2009). How to dig a well by hand. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eM3gVpNflVE

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Treatment, Arrangement and organization.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Physical quality, Aesthetic quality.

S.A. By utilising a combination of knowledge, experience, and intuition (Johnson, 2009) and entering ‘dig a well by hand’ into the search bar of YouTube(YouTube, 2005) many options are presented. With application of time to look at each video, this item has been selected to demonstrate digging a well by hand to access clean water for community members.

This video titled “A day in the life of a Mozambican – How to dig a well” demonstrates to students one of the methods used in developing countries to access clean drinking water. The tools used are extremely basic, and safety protocols are limited to a rope made from ragged cloth. This presentation provides a stark contrast to the methods developed countries use to give individuals access to clean drinking water.

Resource: Water – Global Challenges and Policy of Fresh Water Use.

National Geographic Learning, (2013). National Geographic Learning Reader: Water: Global Challenges and Policy of Freshwater Use, 1st Edition. National Geographic

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement, Authority, Comparison with other works.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Physical Quality, Aesthetic quality, Literary merit, Reputation of producer.
S.A. Nelson secondary catalogue, 2015. Cengage Learning Australia is a leading provider of learning solutions for the school and higher education markets for Australia and New Zealand. Cengage Learning Australia publishes a successful range of school and university educational resources, written by Australian and New Zealand authors who are specialists in their field.
Global Challenges and Policy of Freshwater Use introduces students to many of the real world challenges that both individuals and governments face in deciding how we should manage global freshwater resources. The selected articles pull from current events throughout the world to illustrate a variety of freshwater policy problems, including examples of the effects of changing climates on precipitation patterns, how growing populations and competing industry interests are having to adapt in a world with these changing patterns, and the controversy over what inherent and legal rights nature and wildlife should have in our water policy decisions. eBook available. (Cengage Learning Australia, 2015)

Resource: The Story of Bottled water. (access to fresh water) – 8min 4sec.

Storyofstuffproject. (May 17, 2010). The story of bottled water [Video file]. Retrieved from

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement and organization, Authority, Comparison with other works.

S.P.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Physical quality Aesthetic quality, Reputation of producer.

S.A. The Story of Bottled Water, released on March 22, 2010 (World Water Day) tells the story of manufactured demand—how you get Americans to buy more than half a billion bottles of water every week when it already flows from the tap. Over five minutes, the film explores the bottled water industry’s attacks on tap water and its use of seductive, environmental-themed advertising to cover up the mountains of plastic waste it produces. The film concludes with a call to take back the tap, not only by making a personal commitment to avoid bottled water, but by supporting investments in clean, available tap water for all (Storyofstuffproject, 2010).

The production partners on the bottled water film include five leading sustainability groups: Corporate Accountability International(n.d.), Environmental Working Group (2015), Food & Water Watch (n.d.), Pacific Institute (2015), and Polaris Institute (1997).

Resource: The state of the planet. (Global issues)

Nicholson, J. (2000). The state of the planet. Australia: Allen & Unwin.

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005.) Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement and organisation, Authority, Comparison with other works.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005.) Physical quality, Aesthetic quality, Literary merit, Reputation of Author.
S.A. As the winner of The environmental Award for Children’s Literature in 2001 (Wilderness Society, n.d.), and acknowledged on the International year of Biodiversity 2010 Resource list, and forward by David Suzuki (Suzuki, 2014), this text distills what is known about global warming, pollution, population pressure, resource use, extinction and other environmental issues, with examples from all over the world. Having set out the problems, the author explains what is being done and suggests additional actions. (Trove, n.d.)
To consider, that as humans, we are slower than an elephant, weaker than a gorilla, but we have a huge brain that has more than made up for these deficiencies, but we are still completely dependent on clean air, water, soil and energy for our survival and health. (Suzuki, 2000.) This book suggests to students how future generations can manage human survival into the future.

Resource: Climate Change

National Geographic Society, (1996-2015). National Geographic Learning Reader: Climate Change, 1st Edition. National Geographic Learning.

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement, Authority, Comparison with other works.
S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Physical Quality, Aesthetic quality, Literary merit, Reputation of producer.
S.A. Nelson secondary catalogue, 2015. Cengage Learning Australia is a leading provider of learning solutions for the school and higher education markets for Australia and New Zealand. Cengage Learning Australia publishes a successful range of school and university educational resources, written by Australian and New Zealand authors who are specialists in their field.
A hotly debated and highly contentious subject, global climate change has emerged as one of the most significant threats and challenges of our time. The articles in CLIMATE CHANGE provide a meaningful look at this pressing scientific and social issue. Access to a media enhanced eBook is included. (Cengage Learning Australia, 2015)

WebQuest direct: (Climate change)

McNickle, H. (2008, September 9). Climate Change. What is it? Retrieved from
http://www.webquestdirect.com.au/webquest.asp?id=780

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Treatment, Arrangement and organisation, Authority.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Physical quality, Aesthetic quality, Literary merit.

S.A. Google search ‘4G4 Geography years 7-10 Syllabus’ (BOSNSW, 2003) revealed WebQuest Direct (2015). Founded by Frances Moore, an educational consultant, who conducted a project “Good Practice and Leadership in the Use of Information Communication Technologies in Schools” for the Australian Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training and Education Network in 1999, founded Webquest Direct in 2001. From this point, with a team of subject specific educators, Webquest is now the worlds largest searchable directory of reviewed WebQuests. (WebQuest Direct, 2015).

The Webquest offered in this resource tackles the issue of Climate change, and provides a complete set of lessons, under the structure of Blooms Taxonomy (Bloom, 1956), for the teacher to implement the components as they require. I recommend this unit, and WebQuest Direct, as an all encompassing teaching resource.

Resource: Two men in a tinnie

Film Finance Corporation Australia Limited and Cordell Jigsaw Productions Pty Ltd. (Producer), & Smith, Ashley. (Director). (2006). Two men in a tinnie. [DVD]. Australia: Roadshow Entertainment.

S.C.P.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Appropriateness, Scope, Treatment, Authority.

S.C.S.C. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005). Aesthetic quality, Reputation of producer.

S.A. Located through TROVE (National Library of Australia), produced by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC, 2015), supported in review by Cheryl Critchley (Herald Sun, 2006), with Dr. Tim Flannery advising on paleontology, geology and history joining commentator John Doyle to create a stunning five-part series (Critchley, 2006) which follows the journey of these two men traveling 5000km down the Murray river from it’s origin to where it meets the sea.

Along the way the pair the examine the state of the Murray river, and investigate the impacts of the various uses of the water as it journeys to the ocean. The program looks at long term impacts on the ground water and the problems associated with increasing salinity in the region.

References:

Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, (1995-2005) Emmy Awards retrieved from http://www.emmys.com/

Australian Broadcasting Corporation, (2015) Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/

Bloom, B. (1956) Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, the classification of educational goals – Handbook I: Cognitive Domain New York: McKay

Blooms Taxonomy Retrieved from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/bloomtax.htm

Board of Studies New South Wales, Geography years 7-10 Syllabus (2003). (p32-33). Retrieved from http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/syllabus_sc/pdf_doc/geography_710_syl.pdf

British Broadcasting Corporation, (2015) Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com

Corneliussen, E. (June 13, 2104). The girl who swims with sharks. Retrieved from http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-girl-who-swims-with-sharks-180951671/?no-ist

Cengage Learning Australia Limited, (2015). Retrieved from https://cengage.com.au/

Corporate Accountability International (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.stopcorporateabuse.org/

Critchley, C. (September13, 2006) Two men in a tinnie. Herald Sun. Retrieved from http://www.heraldsun.com.au/entertainment/television/two-men-in-a-tinnie/story-e6frf9ho-1111112196918

Dowling, T. (October 5, 2010.) T.V. review. Horizon: The death of the oceans? The oceans are in danger- maybe i should sign up as a whale-back suction-cup attacher. The Guardian. (Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2010/oct/04/the-death-of-the-oceans

Environmental Working Group (2015). Retrieved from http://www.ewg.org/

Free Range – the next great story is yours. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://freerange.com/

Food & Water Watch (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/

Hughes-Hassell, S. & Mancall, J. (2005). Collection management for youth: Responding to the needs of learners. (p. 46-47). American Library Association: Chicago.

Johnson, P. (2009). Fundamentals of collection development and management. American Library Association, Chicago. (p. 108)

Kaufman Productions Pty Ltd. and Screen Australia. (Producer), Kaufman, Gisela, (Director). (2013). Shark Girl. [DVD]. Australia: ABC Television.

King County Water and land resources Division (2015) Retrieved from http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/wlr.aspx

Leaping Media, (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.leapingmedia.com/

McNickle, H. (2008, September 9). Climate Change. What is it? Retrieved from
http://www.webquestdirect.com.au/webquest.asp?id=780

Molecular Fisheries Laboratory (2013). Retrieved from http://www.molecularfisherieslaboratory.com.au/

National Geographic Learning Reader: Climate Change – See more at: http://www.nelson.com/catalogue/productOverview.do?N=11%204294953508%20115&Ntk=P_EPI&Ntt=1749710653634557381617324507439994166&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial#sthash.IpRcrmfq.dpuf

National Library of Australia(n.d.) Retrieved from http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/179837905?selectedversion=NBD50884471

Nelson secondary catalogue, (2015) Retrieved from https://cengage.com.au/secondary/teachers/catalogues

Nicholson, J. (2000). The state of the planet. Australia: Allen & Unwin.

Ovenden, J. (may 21, 2014) New Australian documentary about shark conservation. Retrieved from http://www.molecularfisherieslaboratory.com.au/new-australian-documentary-about-shark-conservation/

Oxley, P. (Producer), Oxley, P. (Director). (2010). The death of the oceans? [DVD]. United Kingdom: British Broadcasting Corporation Horizons.

Pacific Institute, (2015). Retrieved from http://pacinst.org/

Pappas, S. (June 12, 2014). ‘Shark Girl’ Fights agains fear in a new Documentary. Retrieved from http://www.livescience.com/46071-shark-girl-documentary.html

Polaris Institute, (1997). Retrieved from http://www.polarisinstitute.org/

Ranamm. (May 3, 2006). Groundwater Animation, [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQRvN6MUajE

Renton, A. (July 2, 2014) Deep End – What rapid changes in oceans mean for the earth. Newsweek (2-11-2014) Retrieved from http://www.newsweek.com/2014/07/11/disaster-weve-wrought-worlds-oceans-may-be-irrevocable-256962.html

Seattle Public Schools-TV.(2012) Retrieved from http://district.seattleschools.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=229839

Smithsonian Channel (2010-2015) Retrieved from http://www.smithsonianchannel.com/

SNI/SI Networks L.L.C. © 2010-2015 All rights reserved. Smithsonian Channel is a trademark of Smithsonian Institution. SNI/SI Networks L.L.C. is an authorized user.

State Government Victoria, (2010). Retrieved from https://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/teachlearn/student/lem/lmercinternationalyearofbiodiversitylist.pdf

Storyofstuffproject. (May 17, 2010). The story of bottled water [Video file]. Retrieved from

Suzuki, D. (2014). The David Suzuki Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.davidsuzuki.org/

The Wilderness Society (n.d.) Retrieved from https://www.wilderness.org.au/articles/past-winners-environment-award-childrens-literature

TROVE (n.d.). The state of the planet. Retrieved from http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/6387895?q=the+state+of+the+planet&c=book

UNESCO, (1992-2015) World Heritage Site- The Great Barrier Reef. Retrieved from http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/154

Water: Global Challenges and Policy of Freshwater Use, 1st Edition. Retrieved from http://www.nelson.com/catalogue/productOverview.do?Ntt=Water+978+1133603672||1227016614353537106519319619885334040&N=11&Ntk=nelson%7C%7CP_EPI&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial#sthash.pOIDxH5S.dpuf

Water Tenders (2002) retrieved from http://www.watertenders.org/

WebQuest Direct (2015) Retrieved from http://www.webquestdirect.com.au

YouTube, LLC. (February 14, 2005). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/

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ETL 503: Test Run posting a teaching resource

Resource 1

Oxley, P. (Producer), Oxley, P. (Director). (2010). The death of the oceans?[DVD]. United Kingdom: British Broadcasting Corporation Horizons.
Learner-Centered Selection Criteria: Primary Considerations. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005) Appropriateness, Scope, Accuracy, Authority. (S.C.P.C.)
Learner-Centered Selection Criteria: Secondary Considerations. (Hughes-Hassell and Mancall, 2005.). (S.C.S.C.) Aesthetic quality, Reputation of producer.
Selection Aids (S.A.) This DVD is selected with reference to British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) promotion as one of the most ambitious scientific studies of our time – an investigation into what is happening to our oceans. (BBC, 2011). Presented by the world renowned Sir David Attenborough, with positive review by Tim Dowling, writer for The Guardian (The Guardian, 2010.) and supported by analysis the possibility of irrevocable damage to the world’s oceans by Alex Renton (Newsweek, 2014) this looks to the future and possible outcomes for the worlds oceans.

This DVD explores some of the ways in which we are affecting marine life – from over fishing to the acidification of sea water. It also uncovers the disturbing story of how shipping noise is deafening whales and dolphins, affecting their survival in the future. (BBC, 2010).
References:

Dowling, T. (October 5, 2010.) T.V. review. Horizon: The death of the oceans? The oceans are in danger- maybe I should sign up as a whale-back suction-cup attacher. The Guardian. (Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2010/oct/04/the-death-of-the-oceans

Hughes-Hassell, S. & Mancall, J. (2005). Collection management for youth: Responding to the needs of learners. (p. 46-47). American Library Association: Chicago.

Oxley, P. (Producer), Oxley, P. (Director). (2010). The death of the oceans? [DVD]. United Kingdom: British Broadcasting Corporation Horizons.

Renton, A. (July 2, 2014) Deep End – What rapid changes in oceans mean for the earth. Newsweek (2-11-2014) Retrieved from http://www.newsweek.com/2014/07/11/disaster-weve-wrought-worlds-oceans-may-be-irrevocable-256962.html

ETL401 – Assignment 2: IL models and reflection (Portfolio) Part B: Critical reflection

Prior to commencing this subject, and the overall course Master of  Education (Teacher Librarianship) my views of the role of the TL were limited to say the least.  Co-ordinating the books, recording requested documentary audio visual programs, and perhaps showing the new year 7 students how the library works at high school was the limit, I mean, all librarians do is check out books, right? (Purcell, 2010).  These views did not come from lack of understanding, but from the example I have observed of libraries in operation in the many high schools I have taught in over my career to date, since 1986. Not only many schools, but in many roles, as my career has been as a relief teacher working both as a day-to-day substitute, and on long dedicated blocks over the range of faculties.

I had a feeling that there was more to it than that, but had not given it a great deal of thought.  Now at the end of this first subject ETL401 I can say that my understanding of the role of the TL has broadened significantly.

To consider that the role of the teacher librarian is a multi-faceted one, with the possible roles being a teacher, librarian, information services manager, information literacy leader, curriculum leader, information specialist, instructional partner, website developer, budget manager, staff manager, fiction and non-fiction advocate, (Herring, 2007) I am both excited and daunted. Excited because of the opportunity the TL has to create the environment where the library will become an integral part of the school learning environment and not be perceived as a separate entity (Kay, 2013), and daunted because up to today, the perception has been that libraries have consisted of large collections of books and other materials (Frey, 1997) that people borrow, or sit quietly to read.

There are many concepts that I have been introduced to over the course of this subject. Guided enquiry, constructivist learning, information literacy, the need for Principal support, collaboration, and models which outline the information search process.

On the matter of constructivist and project based learning, I enjoyed the fact that I have used this approach as part of my teaching on many occasions without realising the principle of the concept, and now, with my deeper understanding of its value to student learning, will bring it to the fore of my teaching style as it is a strategy certain to turn traditional classrooms upside down. (Boss & Krauss, 2007).

To the matter of information literacy, the model designed by Kuhlthau where the learner progresses through stages of initiation, selection, exploration, formulation, collection, presentation and assessment (Kuhlthau, 2004) has been a revelation to me regarding the information search process. Indeed I have found myself on many occasions during this subject moving between selection, exploration and and formulation where confusion, frustration and doubt have been the dominant feelings.  But the greatest benefit in understanding the process outlined by this model is that to recognise, and understand, at what point of the model a student is traveling on their search for information, and then being able to guide them towards success.

The understanding of the need of the TL to be a proactive collaborator with staff and the Principal has been an insight which, although I was aware should occur, has been highlighted as of utmost importance.  Collaboration with staff regarding incorporation of the   teaching skills of TL, and library facilities, into their teaching programs, and, collaboration with the Principal regarding having a regular presence in the library confirming the value of the facility as part of the school environment, which will give the students the confidence that the principal supports the library. (Kay, 2013).

Introduction to the Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians (ALIA/ASLA,  2004) has encapsulated, for me, the depth and breadth of understanding I will need to acquire by the completion of the Masters of Education (teacher librarianship) degree.  To fulfill the role to support and implement the vision of the my school community through advocating and building effective library services and programs that contribute to the development of lifelong learners (ALIA/ASLA, 2004) will be my goal, and striving to prioritise when and where to place effort and time will be the skill.

I do not have all the skills needed to fulfill these criteria at the end of this one subject, however, the journey of understanding has commenced and advice is like snow– the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper it sinks into the mind (Samuel  Taylor Coleridge).  I look forward a further precipitation of knowledge and understanding.

References.

Australian School Library Association (ASLA) & Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), (2004).  Standards of professional excellence for teacher librarians in Australian School Library Association.  Retrieved from http://asla.org.au/site/DefaultSite/filesystem/documents/TLstandards.pdf

Boss, S. & Krauss, J. (2007). Reinventing Project-Based Learning. Your Field Guide to Real-World Projects in the Digital Age. International Society for Technology in Education. (ISTE)

Coleridge, S. T. (2003) From a Presentation by Dr Ross Todd, WASLA Conference, 2003.

Frey, T. (1997). The Future of Libraries, Beginning the Great Transformation. Retrieved from http://www.davinciinstitute.com/papers.the-future-of-libraries/

Herring, J. (2007). Teacher librarians and the school library.  In s. Ferguson (Ed.) Libraries in the twenty-first century: charting new directions in information (p. 27-42).  Wagga Wagga, NSW: Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.

Kay. G. (2013). Blog task #2. Role of the TL regarding Principal support.  Retrieved from https://gregskay.wordpress.com

Kuhlthau, C. (2004). Information Search Process. Retrieved from http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~kuhlthau/information_search_process.htm

Purcell. M. (2010). All Librarians Do Is Check Out Books, Right?  A Look at the Roles os a School Library Media Specialist. Library Media Connection 29(3) (p.30-33)

ETL401 – Blog Task #3 : Information Literacy

Throughout the ages the concept of Information Literacy could be considered a constant in that man has always had the need, and desire, for information.  However, as time has passed the information available has become more detailed and diverse in nature as technology has allowed for the development of information sources to evolve.  For an individual to keep in touch with this progression they will need to develop a set of skills which will allow access to information in all it’s forms.  Therefore it could be concluded that information literacy is a set of skills, but these skills will need to be diverse, in order to access this wide range of information.

One may challenge that use of search engines, Web 2.0, or personalized web search devices such as Yahoo search builder, requires something greater than a set of skills, however, to use these simply means our approaches to information literacy have to change.  (O’Connell, 2008).  The user will need to develop new skills to utilise these new tools.  Mitchell (2007) has reiterated that searching for information is more than just a rules-driven process, and there is no one correct way to search for information in this diverse Web 2.0 landscape.

When considering the building block approach suggested by Abilock where information literacy is a transformational process in which the learner needs to find, understand, evaluate, and use information in various forms to create for personal, social or global purposes, (Abilock, 2004) suggests that the enquirer will require a wide range of skills if they are to engage, define, initiate, locate, examine, record, communicate and evaluate (Abilock, 2004) information for the purpose intended.

To examine and understand information in the modern age, the user will require many skills to understand the situation to use appropriate information search techniques. To consider the information literate person is one who;

recognizes the need for information,

understands the extent of information needed,

uses efficient search methods,

evaluates the quality of information and it’s sources,

classifies and stores information,

incorporates selected information into their knowledge base,

uses information efficiently to learn and solve problems,

understands legal and cultural implications in accessing and using information ethically,

uses information for participative citizenship and social responsibility,

and experiences information literacy as part of independent and lifelong learning, (Bundy, 2004) will promote the concept that a diverse range of skills will be required.

As we move into the 21st century Johnson (2006) suggests there are three critical societal changes; the growing digitization and portability of information, emerging fundamental changes in the nature and sources of information, and the critical need for new skills for workers in a global economy. This indicates the ongoing need to develop sound skills in order to stay current with trends in the ever evolving world of information.

So whether the information required is via the medium of paper, web based or digital, the enquirer will need to utilise techniques drawn from a wide variety of skills in order to efficiently and accurately acquire relevant information to satisfy the needs outlaid at the beginning of any search.

References.

Abilock, D. (2004).  Information literacy: an overview of design, process and outcomes. Sourced from www.noodles.com/debbie/literacies/1 over/infolit1.html

Bundy, A. (ed.) (2004). Australian and New Zealand Information Literacy framework: principles, standards and practice.  2nd ed. Adelaide: Australian Institute for Information Literacy (ANZIIL) Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL).

Johnson, D. (2006).  Dangers and Opportunities:  challenges for libraries in the digital agewww.doug.johnson.com/storage/handouts/danger.pdf

Langford, L. (1998.)  Information Literacy: A Clarification. School Libraries worldwide, Volume 4, Number 1. (p.59-72)

Mitchell, P. (2007).  Information Literacy Experts or Expats?  SLANZA Conference www.educationau.edu.au/jahia/webdav/site/myjahiasite/shared/papers/slanza_pm.pdf.

O’Connell, J. (2008).  School Libraries 2.0: new skills, new knowledge, new futures. In P. Godwin & J. Parker (Eds.), Information literacy meets Library 2.0 (p. 51-62).London: Facet Publishing.

ETL401 – Project-Based Learning: Just Scratching the Surface.

Background

Since term 2 our library has been ‘under new management’ so to speak.  That is myself and two other teachers in caretaker role since the retirement of our long standing teacher librarian, and the advertising for another.  Part of our brief has been to change the culture in the library to a more inviting and used space than it has been for some time.  The principal has supported, and promoted, the fact that the library is ‘open for business’ from 8am until the close of school.  This has meant the three of us have split loads of teaching and library management.

The library now can be booked on the school data base where as prior to the change a staff member needed to achieve having their name written on a paper booking sheet, in the librarians office,  that only the librarian was sanctioned write on. This process was intimidating for most of the staff as there would be rules (almost unachievable) that staff must follow in regard to class management, in order to even remain in the library for the duration of the lesson. All too hard for most!

So now, as part of culture change, staff can book the different spaces in the library on the computer booking network if no other class has it booked.  There are 5 separate learning spaces that can be booked.  These are;  computer terminals, interactive white board, study area with class set of tables and chairs, and a video conferencing device.  This can occur now without ‘jumping through  a set of shifting hoops’ laid out in a manner that only the librarian understood.

Project-based Learning

Part of my teaching load is a year 8 geography class. We have been studying geographical global issues.   Part of this topic was the study of global inequities between developed and developing countries.  I gave the class a task to make a comparison between Australia and a country of their choosing.  The only requirement was to address 10 areas.  Access to clean water and sanitation, average annual wage, industry, work and employment opportunities, doctor per thousand of population, type of accommodation and housing available, education, family size, and type of government.

Although there were topics to address, that was it.  The computers were booked for 2 lessons and I let them go to it. Group work was encouraged but the size of the group was not really  specified, just to work with whom they chose.  After the two lessons each group was to report back to the class on what they had found, and put the statistics on a hand drawn grid I put on the board. Without realising it, this appears to me to be a project-based style learning task.  And the results were far beyond my expectation.  Groups reported, peers listened, we discussed the pattern of figures that were being presented and, at the end of the session, the students understood the vast difference between the developed and developing world.

Prominent manufacturing brand names were included in discussion and not just one sided opinion as to the ethics and behaviours of such.  Students analysed the pros and cons of such business activity with understanding of issues of varying points of view from the onlooker to the employee.

In this case the students found technology was a fundamental building block of their experience (Kinory 2007) through use of the computers and the internet.  Here students engaged in real-world activities (Boss, Krauss, 2007) and it really impacted on their understanding of, and respect for, the situation faced by a vast majority of the worlds population.

In conclusion, now having been introduced to the concept of project based learning. I realise that I have just been scratching at the surface of this style of teaching (without realising the concept).  Shifting the instruction from teacher providing information, to the students driving the learning, with the result being far more information and learning occurring due to each student or group bringing their learning to others.  Wow, looking forward to deepening my understanding of project-based learning, and gearing my teaching style to the technologically based 21st century.

May these scratches become highways!

Reference.

Boss, s. and Krauss, J. (2007).  Reinventing Project-Based Learning.  Your Field Guide to Real- World Projects in the Digital Age. (p3-24). International Society for Technology

ETL401 – Blog Task #2: Role of the TL regarding Principal support.

Principal Support.

As the leader of the school the support offered by the principal towards the library, and the teacher librarian, will have a direct bearing on the strength and success of the impact the library and librarian has on the school community.  This support is offered by means of; the principals attitude towards the relationship between the teacher librarian and the staff, their presence in the library environment, and provision of finances to purchase resources.  With principal support the library, and teacher librarian, will become an integral part of the school learning environment and not be perceived as a separate entity.

The attitude of the principal is overwhelmingly the most important aspect of principal support.   From this will stem collaboration between teachers and the teacher librarian, positive student perception of the library and librarian as a resource for learning, and integration of the library into the greater school community.  As mentors providing visibility and importance for the teacher librarians, supportive principals spoke highly of the teacher librarians in their schools and gave clear evidence that they trusted the teacher librarians’ knowledge and expertise. (Oberg, 2006).

When this type of support occurs the value of the library will be considered paramount. The teaching staff will be encouraged to collaborate with the librarian on matters of programing and the library will become an extension of the classroom.  Principals of schools with well integrated, flexible programs demonstrate specific supportive behaviours during both implementation and maintenance phases of any restructuring.  The attitude alone of the principal affects teacher – teacher librarian collaboration. (Haycock, 1996, 1999).

Tallman and van Deusen (1994) found in the United States and Haycock (1996) found in Canada that when the school principal expects team planning between teachers and the teacher librarian, whether as grade level groups or subject area groups, team planning occurs more than when the principal does not expect such collaboration.  This will be of little surprise to teacher librarians, but it does point to the leadership issues and non monetary expectations that help to shape school culture.  (Oberg, 2006).   Teacher librarians plan more units with teachers regardless of the type of schedule if the principal expects team planning.  Tallman and van Deusen (1994),  Haycock (1996).

By having a regular presence in the library the principal will be confirming the value of the facility as part of the school environment. To speak with the students regarding benefits they are gaining through utilisation of the skills of the librarian, and use of the facilities, will give students the confidence that the principal supports the library environment.

Through collaboration of teachers with the teacher librarian a request for resources can be developed. This will lead to the purchasing of the most relevant equipment and learning materials to support the implementation of teaching programs.  For all this to occur Teacher librarians must communicate effectively with their principals.  (Oberg, 2006).

In summary, for an integrated library program to be included as part of the whole school learning environment the attitude of the principal will need to be positive, tactile, and encouraging towards the collaboration between the teaching staff and the teacher librarian.

References.

Haycock, K. (1996). What works: Effective school administrator behaviours. Teacher Librarian, 23(3) (p.33.)

Haycock, K. (1999).  Fostering collaboration, leadership and information literacy:  Common behaviours of uncommon principals and faculties.  NASSP Bulletin 83, (p. 82-87)

Oberg, d. (2006). Developing the respect and support of school administrators.  Teacher Librarian;  Feb 2006; 33(3); ProQuest Central.  (P. 13-18)

Tallman, J. & van Deusen, J. D. (1994). Collaborative unit planning schedule, time, and participants : The 1993-94 AASL/ Highsmith Research award Study Part Three.  School Library Media Quarterly, 23, (p.33-37)

ETL401 – Searching Library Databases

Being a 60’s child searching for books is what I have been used to, so searching online has been a new experience.

Using Primo search I have been finding relevant articles. The advanced search feature helps to narrow searches to specific topics. As a broad search for relevant material I have used the subject number and course relevant texts are offered.

Ebsco search has also been useful, although I have yet to be successful with setting up and using a folder. I am not as comfortable reading from the screen as from a printed document, so, have invested in a printer and when a suitable article is found I print this out. It may not be as streamline as having a folder, but at this stage is the best way for me to study.

I am finding there is a great deal of information available relating to the role of the teacher librarian in the school environment, far more than I am able to digest at this stage of the course, however, there is time to take it in, so persistence is the key here.

Overall, my experience of data base searching has been a steep learning curve, and one which I will improve at with practice.